The Book of Hours combines the threat of today’s fast-moving Middle East problems with the historical mysteries of Indiana Jones or the Da Vinci Code in a clever, funny and ambitious thriller. An unlikely team of reluctant detectives is plunged into a hunt for a murderer in a London library. The death risks sparking Armageddon in the Middle East. How can the clues hidden in the illuminated manuscripts and monastic gardens be deciphered before all hell breaks loose?

Follow @alexborger9 on twitter for updates.

Reviews
“I loved this book. Beautifully written, thrilling, thought-provoking fiction with one foot firmly in the realm of possibility. Recommended.” Nigel Austin, author of the Robin Gibson series

“The Book of Hours is an intriguing, complex story of religious fanaticism and conspiracy. I really enjoyed the intricacies of the plot, likable characters, and the writing style. … a cut above… This book is a quieter, more thoughtful style of storytelling… This book is an interesting combination of global high-stakes thriller and carefully revealed mystery.” Debra Purdy Kong

“Basically Dan Brown with brains.” Tomtom

“A stylish, page-turning thriller. The historical background is extremely well researched and the vivid descriptions of London and Rome draw you into the plot.The protagonist… is quite the most captivating character I’ve come across in a while… I hope this book is just the beginning of a series!” Sarah Dunmore

“The Book of Hours is the first historical novel I’ve read in a while that manages to straddle the line between excitement and historical accuracy” Jacob Tref

“The Temple Mount in Jerusalem is one of the world’s most explosive bits of real-estate. It has started to rumble again … with demands by Jewish militants to extend prayer rights, riots by Palestinians and the killing of several Israelis in knife or car-ramming attacks.” The Economist, 17 November 2014

Jerusalem’s Burning Fuse: “From its first appearance, the Mount was both holy and dangerous. It is arguably “the most sensitive kilometre on earth,” as Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said recently.”  New York Times, 8 November 2014